ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Governor Larry Hogan today announced additional actions on legislation passed during the 2018 session of the Maryland General Assembly:

Governor Hogan vetoed Senate Bill 178 – State Retirement and Pension System – Board of Trustees – Oath, writing that a last-minute amendment added with no hearings or debate changed the bill from a technical fix to codify existing practice of the Board of Trustees of the State Retirement and Pension System to a politically motivated effort to prevent the comptroller from serving as the Chair of the Board in the future. Read the governor’s letter here.

The governor vetoed Senate Bill 838/House Bill 891 – Criminal Procedure – Coram Nobis – Time for Filing, writing that the bill “provides an avenue for repeat violent offenders to eschew consequences of their previous and potentially violent crimes.” The governor cited the administration’s strong record of criminal justice reform that gives nonviolent offenders a second chance, writing, “I would more favorably consider legislation that seeks to expand coram nobis in a way that improves post-conviction relief for individuals with low-level or nonviolent offenses but prevents repeat, violent offenders from taking advantage of the loophole this legislation could create.” Read the governor’s letter here.

Governor Hogan vetoed Senate Bill 572/House Bill 1243 – ​Prevailing Wage Rates – Public Work Contracts – Suits by Employees, writing that the bill is “an inconsistent reversal” of legislation (SB451/HB1100) passed by the Maryland General Assembly action from just a few years ago that required workers to file a complaint with the Commissioner of Labor and Industry before filing a lawsuit. The Hogan administration has a strong record of wage recovery, and the current Prevailing Wage system has successfully resolved every case since 2012 without the need to go to court, at zero cost to workers. Read the governor’s letter here.

The governor vetoed House Bill 548 – Privately Owned Transportation Projects – Construction and Authorization to Use State-Owned Rights-of-Way and Property – Requirements, writing that the bill would “cripple the State’s ability to deliver projects that connect Marylanders to regional jobs and opportunities, including any future efforts to increase passenger rail capacity along the Northeast Corridor.” The governor also noted that the bill as passed was drafted in the final hours of the legislative session without any opportunity for public input or scrutiny, and likely conflicts with federal law. Read the governor’s letter here.

Governor Hogan vetoed House Bill 180 – Railroad Company – Movement of Freight – Required Crew, writing that the bill “attempts to codify a private industry issue that should either continue to be negotiated between the employer and the employer’s representatives or decided at the federal level since it involves interstate commerce and clearly falls within the federal government’s regulatory purview,” and citing the competitive disadvantage to the Port of Baltimore that would result from the legislation. Read the governor’s letter here.

The governor vetoed House Bill 335 – State Personnel – Grievance Procedures – Exclusive Representatives, writing that the bill would undermine the administration’s recent successful efforts at collectively bargaining a three-year Memoranda of Understanding with AFSCME, AFT, and MPEC, which included specific provisions regarding the dispute resolution process that rely on neutral fact finders and an appeal to the State Labor Relations Board. Read the governor’s letter here.

Additionally, the governor allowed Senate Bill 875/House Bill 981 – Online Electioneering Transparency and Accountability Act to go into law without his signature, writing that while the bill seeks to achieve “a number of laudable goals that I strongly support, including modernizing Maryland’s election laws to recognize and regulate electronic communication on the web and requiring additional disclosure and transparency for those advertising on social media platforms,” serious constitutional concerns have been raised about the way the bill is structured. These concerns include the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association’s assertion that the bill could allow the government to coerce news outlets protected by the First Amendment to publish certain material. Read the governor’s letter here.

For a complete list of Senate bills that Governor Hogan allowed to become law without his signature, click here.

For a complete list of House bills that Governor Hogan allowed to become law without his signature, click here.