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MARYLAND – As the environment in the U.S. shifts because of remote work, people now have more options on places to live since they do not have to necessarily live where they work. Although Maryland has shown to have one of the best school systems and has been one of the hardest-working states, Maryland was recently found to be the 7th most expensive state to live in, according to a study from Test Optimize Perform (TOP) data.

TOP, a global marketing agency network, compared the 50 states on eight key dimensions. This includes affordability, crime and safety, economy, education, healthcare, infrastructure, opportunity, and quality of life. These dimensions were ranked using 76 metrics.

Each metric was graded on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the max. They determined each state’s weighted average across all metrics to get its overall score and used the resulting scores to rank the states.

Maryland was ranked the 7th most expensive state to live in and the 21st overall best state to live in. Maryland ranked 44th in affordability and 17th in crime and safety. Additionally, Maryland clocked in with the 18th best economy and 22nd best education system.

The study had Maryland ranked 8th in healthcare and 2nd in infrastructure. Finally, Maryland was ranked 23rd in quality of life and 30th in opportunities.

“Not all states are cut from the same cloth. Some excel in education, while others may be better at infrastructure,” TOP data said in the report.

Even though Maryland was ranked high in other categories, this study shows Maryland may have some areas of improvement to maintain its population.

Contact our news desk at news@thebaynet.com

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24 Comments

  1. Property taxes are hurting seniors. Income levels are to low for a 2 person household that are over 70 years old and have lived in their homes for 20 years. Income levels for Homestead Property Credit and Homeowners Property Credit need to be raised so seniors can qualify.

  2. I’ve found the studies to be mostly useless. It generally only takes a few seconds to determine the biases or the outright stupidity in the methodology (if there even is a methodology).

    One only has to look at the methodology in the “Affordability” scale here to determine how silly this study is:

    The sales tax and state income tax has twice as much importance as the cost of groceries, utilities and what they call a “transportation cost index”. That is inherently stupid.

    The “value” (not cost) of a home has twice the weighting as the cost of rent.

    It goes on like this as you look at the other categories.

      1. So you are now relegated to searching and replying to posts I made days ago? And this is what you post?

        You really are pathetic.

  3. i believe it & what do we have to show for it? Maryland is in la la land compared to the rest of the country. Maryland should apologise (those that are responsible) for all the havoc it wreekes on the rest of the country.

    1. Maryland has one the highest incomes per capita, one of the best hospitals, some of the wealthiest counties, one of the most highly educated populations, and one of the most stable economies in the country.

      1. Where’d you find that information? Maryland’s average income is only $66,000 a year, sure it’s higher than the national average but home costs and rent costs at that income are impossible to meet, that’s why there’s so many blue collar workers leaving

        1. From the BEA’s Personal Income by County, Metro, and Other Areas. If you count DC, then MD is essentially tied for 6th with CA. If you don’t count DC, then we are tied for 5th. You don’t seem to realize that income is different from expense.

        2. Or you could look at Statista’s Per capita personal income in the United States in 2020, by state which puts MD at #8 on per capita income. In any case, my statement that MD has one of the highest per capita incomes is correct.

          1. Maryland also has some of the highest tax rates in the country as well
            The problem is there are so many federal government workers pulling in $150,000 plus a year driving the cost of everything around here through the roof
            I’m just counting down the days until I leave, it’s just not affordable anymore

  4. It is unbelievable the cost of living in Maryland is, my entire family left Maryland 13 years ago, and I am finally going to follow them
    I need to purchase a larger home for my family as we have long outgrown our current home, however we cannot afford to rent nor do we qualify to purchase another home, even with all the equity I have in my current home it’s not enough to purchase another home
    Currently in Calvert the cheapest homes are going for high $300000 range unless you want to live in the ranch club which I’m definitely not doing as I’m trying to leave that hole. As a blue collar average worker owning another home in Maryland is just a pipe dream and will never happen, I am making the jump to Kentucky with my family, I can make exactly what I make yearly here and the homes are all under $200,000
    Don’t even get me started on property taxes here, I currently pay $2000 a year on a .25 acre lot with a 1000 square foot house, plus the ranch club theft tax which is additional $275, plus their nearly $500 hoa fees, in Kentucky my parents own a 2100 square foot home, 3 car garage on 13 acres and pay $480 dollars a year in taxes
    Goodbye Maryland!

  5. “Maryland also has some of the highest tax rates in the country as well
    The problem is there are so many federal government workers pulling in $150,000 plus a year driving the cost of everything around here through the roof. I’m just counting down the days until I leave, it’s just not affordable anymore.”

    So what exactly do you want to talk about? You apparently disagreed with my comment that MD is among the highest income earning states. You offered no proof. I did. Then you pivot to taxes. Yes, in higher income states, taxes tend to be higher. Services also tend to be higher. You move to a lower income state and the standard of living is lower. If you are poor here, you will be poor there. Income levels are generally commiserate with the overall standard of living.

    1. If you would take a minute to read the long comment I made I’m moving out of Maryland, it’s not affordable to live here any longer, Maryland has a average wage of $66000 a year, that does not justify the rent costs and prices of homes in Maryland, I’m moving to Kentucky where I can make exactly what I do here and homes are a fraction of what they cost here, why do you think retirees are fleeing by the dozens?

  6. “Maryland also has some of the highest tax rates in the country as well
    The problem is there are so many federal government workers pulling in $150,000 plus a year driving the cost of everything around here through the roof I’m just counting down the days until I leave, it’s just not affordable anymore.” Yeah, that’s how it works. Higher standards of living means incomes and expenses are higher. Move to a lower standard of living state and surprise (!!!) income and expenses are lower. If you don’t like it in MD, you are free to move.

    1. I am leaving if you would take the time to read my comments, good grief your a pretty rude individual, no wonder I’m leaving Maryland, it’s full of yuppies that think they know it all

      1. Good lord…I am responding to your comments to me. If you can’t keep up, that’s your fault not mine. I am not being rude. I am pointing out simple economic realities that you obviously can’t comprehend.

      1. The breakdown of moves out to moves in was 52% to 48%. Do you think a 52/48 ration has any meaning at all? You’ll fit in well in Kentucky. Wallethub ranks KY 45th in least educated states.

    2. And you didn’t read the article that baynet put out, Maryland is 44th in affordability, there’s only 50 states, so not sure what your angle here is

      1. Yeah. I did read the article Baynet posted. Maybe YOU should have read my first comment? You know, the one you first replied to?

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