Everyone loves a great Valentine’s Day present or a romantic dinner out, but you can’t always assume that will happen. A  survey of 3,121 Americans underlines how what you get is likely to depend on where you live and how long you’ve been in a relationship.
  • 34% of Americans plan to celebrate Valentine’s Day by going to a restaurant
  • Those who are in 2 to 5 year relationship will get the highest valued gifts
  • Married couples were the most likely not to buy a gift at all
  • 30% of Americans have hidden purchases from their loved ones
If you’re hoping for an extravagant gift from your one true love come February 14, it pays to live in Kansas, Nevada, Idaho, Hawaii or North Dakota. Those are the five states where people are planning to spend more than $100 on their partner. Life is less pleasing in New Hampshire, where the predicted spend is just $31. Here’s how much people are planning to spend on Valentine’s Day in each state, based on the survey.
  • Alabama – $60
  • Alaska – $43
  • Arizona – $68
  • Arkansas – $93
  • California – $82
  • Colorado – $65
  • Connecticut – $45
  • Delaware – $36
  • Florida – $83
  • Georgia – $68
  • Hawaii – $102
  • Idaho – $111
  • Illinois – $55
  • Indiana – $80
  • Iowa – $50
  • Kansas – $117
  • Kentucky – $36
  • Louisiana – $53
  • Maine – $36
  • Maryland – $64
  • Massachusetts – $67
  • Michigan – $58
  • Minnesota – $49
  • Mississippi – $46
  • Missouri – $45
  • Montana – $56
  • Nebraska – $51
  • Nevada – $112
  • New Hampshire – $31
  • New Jersey – $67
  • New Mexico – $47
  • New York – $65
  • North Carolina – $59
  • North Dakota – $108
  • Ohio – $41
  • Oklahoma – $42
  • Oregon – $40
  • Pennsylvania – $60
  • Rhode Island – $52
  • South Carolina – $82
  • South Dakota – $36
  • Tennessee – $73
  • Texas – $78
  • Utah – $73
  • Vermont – $36
  • Virginia – $87
  • Washington – $70
  • West Virginia – $39
  • Wisconsin – $64
  • Wyoming – $36

One thing those averages don’t tell you is whether you’ll be receiving a gift at all. The chances are quite good you won’t: 37% of Americans don’t plan to buy their partner a gift. And there’s a gender split: 31% of men don’t plan to buy a gift, while 44% of women intended Valentine’s Day to pass gift-free.

The value of those gifts also falls the longer you’ve been in a relationship. In the first five years the average spend is as much as $76, but after 20 years it drops to just $49. And being married drops your odds: just 51% of husbands and 66% of wives receive a Valentine’s gift, compared with 69% of boyfriends and 76% of girlfriends.

 

Article source: http://www.finder.com/valentines-gifts-2016