ANNAPOLIS, Md. – The corn mazes are wrapping up, farmers markets are shifting to their winter offerings, and the trees across Maryland are preparing for their winter break. But there are still opportunities to see fall color, especially in the central and eastern parts of the state. A good way to enjoy the remaining fall days is with a drive along one of Maryland’s Scenic byways. At this point, the Roots and Tides, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad, Chesapeake Country, Religious Freedom, and John Wilkes Booth trails are your best bets for capturing fall’s final curtain call. Colors are still muted compared to previous years but there are plenty of beautiful spots that make it worth the trip.


The one red leaf, the last of its clan,
That dances as often as dance it can,
Hanging so light, and hanging so high,
On the topmost twig that looks up at the sky.

– Samuel Taylor Coleridge


Join us as we follow the transition each week with reports from our experts at our state forests and parks. This year for the first time, we welcome all of Maryland’s outdoor enthusiasts to send in photos capturing the beauty of the fall season. Please use the submission form to submit your entries directly to us. Your photo might be selected to appear in a future edition of the Fall Foliage Report!

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Baltimore and Howard Counties, Maryland
Patapsco Valley State Park

High in the sky, the sun casts down on the Hollofield Overlook at Patapsco Valley State Park. Alyssa Myers – Patapsco Valley State Park


Cecil County, Maryland
Fair Hill Natural Resources Management Area and Bohemia River State Park

At Fair Hill, fall colors are glorious this week, especially along the river. The hickories are out in their fully golden splendor, vibrant against the still-green beeches which often grow alongside them.  Crisp air, the scent of fallen leaves, and expansive views make this a perfect time to get out there and go on a hike. Ranger Lesley Leader – Fair Hill NRMA, Bohemia River State Park


Dorchester County, Maryland
Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park

The colorful blooms typical of early fall are giving way to hues of ruby red, orange, and golden yellow in Tubman Country. The maple and sweet gum trees are the stars of the show this week! Rangers Cierra Maszkiewicz and Dana Paterra


Photo Submissions for the Week

We’d like to thank all the folks that continue to send in photos of fall scenes from around Maryland. Glimpses of fall and shorter days can be seen from all parts of the state thanks to your participation. Please send us your fall foliage photos, including the names of any tree species you spot, using our easy online form!

Lauren P. – Pocomoke State Forest, Worcester County

Lauren P. – Pocomoke State Forest, Worcester County

Kristin C. – Deep Creek Lake, Garrett County

Bob M. – Route 331, Talbot County

Joseph D. – Patterson Park, Baltimore County

Joseph D. – Patterson Park, Baltimore County

Jennifer E. – Eastern Neck Island, Rock Hall, Kent County

Lauren P. – Bill Burton Fishing Pier, Talbot County side

Lori C. – Clarksville, Howard County

Lori C. – Clarksville, Howard County

Lori C. – Centennial Park, Howard County

Robin F. –  Hambrooks Boulevard, Cambridge, Dorchester County

Vincent C – Clopper Lake, Seneca Creek State Park, Montgomery County


Fall Recreation Spotlight
Nature Journaling at Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area
Monday, November 15, 2021

Join us for a short hike along a part of the Serpentine Trail to experience our globally rare prairie remnant area. Nature journals will be provided to record your journey. Cost is $1. Begins at 3 p.m. at Soldiers Delight Visitor Center. Call 410-461-5005​ for information.


 

Watch the sky
The Leonid meteor shower peaks November 17; the span of the shower goes from November 6 – 30. The moon will be almost full for the peak night so the trick will be to avoid the moon this week, start early, and try your luck. On November 12, the moon sets at midnight. Each night after, it sets a little later and by November 16 it will be setting around 4 a.m. Remember, it takes about a half hour for your eyes to get acclimated to the darkness. Dress warm, bring a chair, and enjoy the show!

Photo: NASA