American Indian Heritage Day
Governor Larry Hogan

ANNAPOLIS, MD—Governor Larry Hogan today proclaimed November 25 as American Indian Heritage Day in Maryland. The annual holiday, observed in the state since 2008, recognizes both the historical and contemporary contributions and achievements of Maryland’s tribes and indigenous peoples.

“American Indian Heritage Day is a time to honor and reflect upon the rich American Indian culture that is a deeply rooted part of Maryland’s history, present, and future,” said Governor Hogan. “Today we honor Maryland’s diverse American Indian communities, and thank them for their many contributions to our great state.”

The United States House of Representatives introduced legislation to establish American Indian Heritage Day in the United States in 2007, designating the Friday after Thanksgiving as a day to pay tribute to Native Americans across the country. The bill became law in October 2008. Prior to the national institution of the holiday, the Maryland General Assembly established American Indian Heritage Day in Maryland during the 2008 legislative session.

Earlier this month, Governor Hogan proclaimed November as American Indian Heritage Month in Maryland.

To observe the holiday this year, the Governor’s Office of Community Initiatives and the Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs will attend an event at Port Discovery Children’s Museum in Baltimore. Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs Administrative Director E. Keith Colston will present Governor Hogan’s proclamation, with Chair Sherry Ayers and invited guests in attendance.

In addition to coordinating programs to advance the cultural, educational, economic, and social development of Maryland’s diverse American Indian communities, the Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs oversees the process of designating Maryland American Indian status. Maryland’s state-recognized tribes include the Accohannock Tribe, the Piscataway Indian Nation, and the Piscataway Conoy Tribe. Maryland’s American Indian communities also include the Nause-Waiwash Band of Indians, the Pocomoke Indian Nation, the Assateague Indians, and the Youghiogheny Shawnee.

“Throughout the tenure of the Hogan administration, we have forged invaluable relationships within Maryland’s American Indian communities,” said Governor’s Office of Community Initiatives Executive Director Steven J. McAdams. “Partnership and collaboration are key to engaging communities as we look to the future and honor the Marylanders we serve.”

For more information about the Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs, visit goci.maryland.gov.

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